Original Article

Title

Include the following information:

  • Full title of the manuscript
  • Authors’ names (first and last names, middle initial when commonly used by that author)
  • Institutional affiliation for each author (use super-scripted numbers after each author’s name)
  • Corresponding author:First and last names, middle initial when commonly used by that author; Address and Email:

Abstract

Full-Length Original Research reports should consist of four sections, labeled: Objective; Material and Methods; Results; Conclusion. This structured summary should concisely and specifically describe why and how the study was performed, the essential results, and what the authors conclude from the results.

Keywords

Keywords are significant words in medical indexing. They are useful as a tool when researching for paper information from lists of medical journals.

Introduction

State the objectives of the study clearly and concisely, and provide a context for the study by referring judiciously to previous work in the area. Do not attempt to present a comprehensive review of the field. Provide a statement about the significance of this research for understanding and/or treating the concerned disease.

Materials and Methods

Describe the research methods in sufficient detail that the work can be duplicated; alternatively, give references (if they are readily accessible) and comprehensive descriptions. Identify the statistical procedures that were used and the rationale for choosing a particular method, especially if it is not standard.

Results

Results should be reported fully and concisely, in a logical order. Descriptive information provided in figure legends need not be repeated in the text; use the text, however, to describe key features of the figures. When appropriate, give sample numbers, the range and standard deviation (or mean error) of measurements, and significance values for compared populations.

Discussion

Provide an interpretation of the results and assess their significance in relation to previous work in the field. Do not repeat the results. Do not engage in general discussion beyond the scope of the experimental results.

Conclusion

Conclusions should be supported by the data obtained in the reported study; avoid speculation not warranted by experimental results, and label speculation clearly.

Acknowledgements

All acknowledgements including financial support should be mentioned under the heading "acknowledgements" and not as footnotes on the first page or in the text.

References

Authors are responsible for the accuracy of their references. In manuscript, please number the cited references in chronological order and superscript them at the end of sentence. All references cited in the text (including those included in figure legends and tables) should be listed References.

Start the References on a separate page, and arrange citations in chronological order so that they will be in sequence with references cited in the text. List all authors when there are three or fewer; when there are four or more, list the first three, followed by "et al.", title of the article, journal name (in italics - use PubMed abbreviations), year of publication (followed by a semicolon), volume number (followed by a colon) and pages (first - last page numbers). Reference to electronic material should include author name(s), date, article title, and journal (as above); where volume and/or page numbers are not available, substitute Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number. Numbered references to personal communication, unpublished data, or manuscripts either "in preparation" or "submitted for publication" are unacceptable. If essential, such material can be incorporated at the appropriate place in the text.

The following are sample references:

  1. Saengpattrachai M, Srinualta D, Lorlertratna N, et al. Public familiarity with, knowledge of, and predictors of negative attitudes toward epilepsy in Thailand. Epilepsy Behav2010;17:487-505.
  2. Saengpattrachai M, Sharma R, Hunjan A, et al. Nonconvulsive seizures in the pediatric intensive care unit: etiology, EEG, and brain imaging findings. Epilepsia2006;47:1510-8.
  3. Treiman DM, Delgado-Escueda AV. Status epilepticus. In: Thompson RA, Green RA, Green JR,eds. Critical Care of Neurological and Neurosurgical Emergencies. New York: Raven, 1980:53-99.
  4. Kuczmarski RJ, Ogden CL, Grammer-Strawn LM, et al. CDC growth charts: United States. Advancedata from vital and health statistics. No. 314. Hyattsville, Md.: National Center for Health Statistics, 2000. (DHHS publication no. (PHS) 2000-1250 0-0431.)